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March 2018

Viewing posts from March , 2018

Sen. Rand Paul: Why I’ll Fight Gina Haspel and Mike Pompeo Nominations

Since President Trump took office, our country finally seems to be heading in the right direction. In just the past year, the American people have seen enormous tax cuts, more judges appointed who take the Constitution seriously, relief from the massive regulatory state, and an economy rapidly gaining strength and offering greater opportunities for those seeking to turn their dreams into reality.

But when it comes to our place on the world stage, we are at a crossroads. We can continue to build on our recent successes by reaffirming America’s role as a trusted, powerful nation guided by principle. Or we can throw it all away by allowing neocon interventionists to infiltrate our leadership and make America the purveyor of destruction.

For decades, we have failed to bring about real peace thanks to a foreign policy guided by the idea that war and intervention are the answers. “Blow up and rebuild” has been the battle cry of those determined to keep us perpetually in conflict.

It was the battle cry of Hillary Clinton, who supported military intervention in Iraq, Syria, and Libya. I supported President Trump during his campaign because he advocated for less military intervention. He opposed the Iraq War. He acknowledged that nation-building doesn’t work. He understood the damage previous foreign policy missteps have caused, including helping to strengthen ISIS.

I want to continue making America great again. That won’t happen if we give power-hungry neocons the reins to our nation’s foreign policy.

People already distrust the CIA. So why on earth has this administration picked someone to run the Agency who was instrumental in running a place where people were tortured and then covered it up afterwards?

Multiple undisputed accounts have detailed how Gina Haspel not only ran a CIA “black site” in Thailand but also destroyed video evidence of torture.

Full Commentary by Sen. Rand Paul @ http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/rand-paul-why-ill-fight-gina-haspels-and-mike-pompeos-nominations/

Drudge or Producer?

Of all imaginary crises to worry about, the spectre of automation is among the most fashionable and enduring, since the times of Ned Ludd.
 
“About 35 percent of China’s labor force is in agriculture (compared to 2.5 percent in the U.S.). There are 425 million agricultural workers (200 million farming households) in China. A little over a decade ago China was home to 700 million farmers. They made up about 60 percent of the population.” (source)
 
In short, China has “lost” 275 million agricultural jobs. Alternatively, some other sectors gained 275 million workers. Is this a good or bad thing? By all accounts, food production is up. People have been freed to do other productive things. People in China are living better, along some metrics, than before. Sure, pollution has increased; but they’re working on that problem too.

Some of us remember when typewriters and secretaries were ubiquitous in every office. They have been replaced with computers, empowering each of us to type our own emails, to gather information, to create reports, and so forth. We’ve become more productive, and now have entire job categories which were previously unimaginable.

Robotics increases our productivity; it enables us to create more of everything which we value.
Increased productivity is not an evil to be avoided, unless we value drudgery for its own sake.

Drudge or Producer?

Of all imaginary crises to worry about, the spectre of automation is among the most fashionable and enduring, since the times of Ned Ludd.
 
“About 35 percent of China’s labor force is in agriculture (compared to 2.5 percent in the U.S.). There are 425 million agricultural workers (200 million farming households) in China. A little over a decade ago China was home to 700 million farmers. They made up about 60 percent of the population.” (source)
 
In short, China has “lost” 275 million agricultural jobs. Alternatively, some other sectors gained 275 million workers. Is this a good or bad thing? By all accounts, food production is up. People have been freed to do other productive things. People in China are living better, along some metrics, than before. Sure, pollution has increased; but they’re working on that problem too.

Some of us remember when typewriters and secretaries were ubiquitous in every office. They have been replaced with computers, empowering each of us to type our own emails, to gather information, to create reports, and so forth. We’ve become more productive, and now have entire job categories which were previously unimaginable.

Robotics increases our productivity; it enables us to create more of everything which we value.
Increased productivity is not an evil to be avoided, unless we value drudgery for its own sake.

Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

California Libertarian Party Southern Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

Events: San Diego Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday January 27th at the Green Dragon Tavern in Carlsbad. A new slate of officers was elected listed at www.sdlp.org . Executive Chair, Brad Richardson, chair@sdlp.org Vice-Chair, Carlos Morales, vicechair@sdlp.org Treasurer, Unfilled, treasurer@sdlp.org Secretary, John Brandmair, secretary@sdlp.org Membership Chair, Alan Ritter, members@sdlp.org Publicity Chair, Joseph DePaul, pr@sdlp.org Campaigns Chair, Paul King, campaigns@sdlp.org Spokesperson, Don Deangelo, spokesperson@sdlp.org San Bernardino County Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday February 10th in Upland. https://sbclp.org/ . Chair: Tony Tyler Vice Chair: Brian Ryman Treasurer: David Holman Secretary: Ben Gibbins At-Large: Dr. Matthew Pautz California Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for April 27-29 2018, Long Beach Marriot 4700 Airport Plaza Dr Long Beach, CA 90815, https://ca.lp.org/convention/ .
Los Angeles County Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for June 2, 2018, at Taix Restaurant, 1911 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026, time TBA.
Southern California Libertarian Conference, Saturday June 23, 2018, 12pm-4pm program, 4pm-?? after party. Geezers, 12120 Telegraph Rd, Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Candidates Running in So. Cal. or Statewide from So. Cal.:Oxnard Recall Election May 1, 2018Starr, Aaron, City of Oxnard Mayor https://www.starrforoxnard.com/ California Primary June 5th 2018Ferreira, Tim, CA Lt. Governor https://crm.tim2018.com/ Gibbins, Ben, 52nd Assembly, http://www.bengibbins.com/ Hall, Jonathan Director, Tehachapi Cummings Water DIstrict, http://votersedge.org/ca/en/ballot/election/area/42/contests/contest/14372/candidate/134264?election_authority_id=15 Hancock, Joshua, CA 49th Assembly www.votejoshuahancock49th.usHerd, Mark Matthew, CA 2th Senate https://sites.google.com/site/herdforcd5/ Hewitt, Jeff, Riverside County Supervisor http://www.votehewitt.com/ Lewis, Michael, 53rd CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/lewisforassembly/ Lightfoot, Gail, CA Secretary of State Mahoney, Michael, Orange County Supervisor ElectMahony.com/McArdle, Angela 34th Congressional (U.S.) http://angelamcardleforcongress.com/ Reid, Derrick Michael, US Senate www.derrickmreid.com/Reiser, Brandon, 48th Congressional (U.S.) https://www.brandonreiser.com/ Robson, Honor, 70th CA Assembly https://www.honorrobson.com/ Shaw, Kevin, 38th CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/KevinShaw4Liberty/ Tomolak, Josh, San Diego City Council www.tomolak4sd.com/Wildstar, Nikolas, CA Governor http://governorwildstar.com/ This may be the most Libertarian candidates running in a primary in or from Southern California since Top Two. If I have missed anyone or anything let me know and I’ll update the list. For updates or information about candidates in or from Northern California, check out https://ca.lp.org/2018-whos-running/ . To see a video of me delivering this Report, it’s near the beginning at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoGK8mADDAs . Issues: The aftermath of Dovner v. LPLAC is still causing real trouble in LA County. We’ve had officers cooperating to create a zero-sum game where none existed before, to quash activism in the County. Members have expressed serious grievances that have gone unresolved, and alleged actionable torts. Officers have escalated the conflict instead of defusing it. LPLAC will resolve the issue internally. It is fortunate that the victims are dedicated libertarians who are committed to resolution using libertarian principles. They are not likely to sue the Party, but do not expect them to bury the wrongs done to them. I hope that they will continue to expose the wrongs until those responsible take action to make amends. It's so much better than walking away hurt or embittered.
Officers of the Party should be peacemakers, not factional warriors. Our party will only grow by accepting diversity. We can’t build lasting consensus by quashing dissent. When members can’t work out disputes among themselves, the option most consistent with non-aggression is to agree on a process for resolving their differences. Where all are free and equal, only a neutral process acceptable to both parties can resolve questions of fault and set remedies for wrongs. If not the bad feelings continue and past mistakes can’t be fixed. So if you’re a party member and are aware of a grievance against you, reach out and discuss the issue privately with the member who has the grievance. If the other member is offering to meet you, accept the offer! So much the more if you are an officer. Otherwise you are declaring war. The other side can only conclude you have no interest in peace.
Affiliate Support: The LPC has budgeted support for the Southern California LP Office, to be supervised by the S. VIce Chair. Please contact me (jonathan@jaech.net) if you need materials, equipment or other support for LP activism in the region. The budget is large enough to make a difference for grass-roots activism.

Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

California Libertarian Party Southern Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

Events: San Diego Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday January 27th at the Green Dragon Tavern in Carlsbad. A new slate of officers was elected listed at www.sdlp.org . Executive Chair, Brad Richardson, chair@sdlp.org Vice-Chair, Carlos Morales, vicechair@sdlp.org Treasurer, Unfilled, treasurer@sdlp.org Secretary, John Brandmair, secretary@sdlp.org Membership Chair, Alan Ritter, members@sdlp.org Publicity Chair, Joseph DePaul, pr@sdlp.org Campaigns Chair, Paul King, campaigns@sdlp.org Spokesperson, Don Deangelo, spokesperson@sdlp.org San Bernardino County Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday February 10th in Upland. https://sbclp.org/ . Chair: Tony Tyler Vice Chair: Brian Ryman Treasurer: David Holman Secretary: Ben Gibbins At-Large: Dr. Matthew Pautz California Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for April 27-29 2018, Long Beach Marriot 4700 Airport Plaza Dr Long Beach, CA 90815, https://ca.lp.org/convention/ .
Los Angeles County Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for June 2, 2018, at Taix Restaurant, 1911 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026, time TBA.
Southern California Libertarian Conference, Saturday June 23, 2018, 12pm-4pm program, 4pm-?? after party. Geezers, 12120 Telegraph Rd, Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Candidates Running in So. Cal. or Statewide from So. Cal.:Oxnard Recall Election May 1, 2018Starr, Aaron, City of Oxnard Mayor https://www.starrforoxnard.com/ California Primary June 5th 2018Ferreira, Tim, CA Lt. Governor https://crm.tim2018.com/ Gibbins, Ben, 52nd Assembly, http://www.bengibbins.com/ Hall, Jonathan Director, Tehachapi Cummings Water DIstrict, http://votersedge.org/ca/en/ballot/election/area/42/contests/contest/14372/candidate/134264?election_authority_id=15 Hancock, Joshua, CA 49th Assembly www.votejoshuahancock49th.usHerd, Mark Matthew, CA 2th Senate https://sites.google.com/site/herdforcd5/ Hewitt, Jeff, Riverside County Supervisor http://www.votehewitt.com/ Lewis, Michael, 53rd CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/lewisforassembly/ Lightfoot, Gail, CA Secretary of State Mahoney, Michael, Orange County Supervisor ElectMahony.com/McArdle, Angela 34th Congressional (U.S.) http://angelamcardleforcongress.com/ Reid, Derrick Michael, US Senate www.derrickmreid.com/Reiser, Brandon, 48th Congressional (U.S.) https://www.brandonreiser.com/ Robson, Honor, 70th CA Assembly https://www.honorrobson.com/ Shaw, Kevin, 38th CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/KevinShaw4Liberty/ Tomolak, Josh, San Diego City Council www.tomolak4sd.com/Wildstar, Nikolas, CA Governor http://governorwildstar.com/ This may be the most Libertarian candidates running in a primary in or from Southern California since Top Two. If I have missed anyone or anything let me know and I’ll update the list. For updates or information about candidates in or from Northern California, check out https://ca.lp.org/2018-whos-running/ . To see a video of me delivering this Report, it’s near the beginning at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoGK8mADDAs . Issues: The aftermath of Dovner v. LPLAC is still causing real trouble in LA County. We’ve had officers cooperating to create a zero-sum game where none existed before, to quash activism in the County. Members have expressed serious grievances that have gone unresolved, and alleged actionable torts. Officers have escalated the conflict instead of defusing it. LPLAC will resolve the issue internally. It is fortunate that the victims are dedicated libertarians who are committed to resolution using libertarian principles. They are not likely to sue the Party, but do not expect them to bury the wrongs done to them. I hope that they will continue to expose the wrongs until those responsible take action to make amends. It's so much better than walking away hurt or embittered.
Officers of the Party should be peacemakers, not factional warriors. Our party will only grow by accepting diversity. We can’t build lasting consensus by quashing dissent. When members can’t work out disputes among themselves, the option most consistent with non-aggression is to agree on a process for resolving their differences. Where all are free and equal, only a neutral process acceptable to both parties can resolve questions of fault and set remedies for wrongs. If not the bad feelings continue and past mistakes can’t be fixed. So if you’re a party member and are aware of a grievance against you, reach out and discuss the issue privately with the member who has the grievance. If the other member is offering to meet you, accept the offer! So much the more if you are an officer. Otherwise you are declaring war. The other side can only conclude you have no interest in peace.
Affiliate Support: The LPC has budgeted support for the Southern California LP Office, to be supervised by the S. VIce Chair. Please contact me (jonathan@jaech.net) if you need materials, equipment or other support for LP activism in the region. The budget is large enough to make a difference for grass-roots activism.

Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

California Libertarian Party Southern Vice Chair Report Q1 2018

Events: San Diego Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday January 27th at the Green Dragon Tavern in Carlsbad. A new slate of officers was elected listed at www.sdlp.org . Executive Chair, Brad Richardson, chair@sdlp.org Vice-Chair, Carlos Morales, vicechair@sdlp.org Treasurer, Unfilled, treasurer@sdlp.org Secretary, John Brandmair, secretary@sdlp.org Membership Chair, Alan Ritter, members@sdlp.org Publicity Chair, Joseph DePaul, pr@sdlp.org Campaigns Chair, Paul King, campaigns@sdlp.org Spokesperson, Don Deangelo, spokesperson@sdlp.org San Bernardino County Libertarian Party Annual Convention held Saturday February 10th in Upland. https://sbclp.org/ . Chair: Tony Tyler Vice Chair: Brian Ryman Treasurer: David Holman Secretary: Ben Gibbins At-Large: Dr. Matthew Pautz California Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for April 27-29 2018, Long Beach Marriot 4700 Airport Plaza Dr Long Beach, CA 90815, https://ca.lp.org/convention/ .
Los Angeles County Libertarian Party Annual Convention scheduled for June 2, 2018, at Taix Restaurant, 1911 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90026, time TBA.
Southern California Libertarian Conference, Saturday June 23, 2018, 12pm-4pm program, 4pm-?? after party. Geezers, 12120 Telegraph Rd, Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670
Candidates Running in So. Cal. or Statewide from So. Cal.:Oxnard Recall Election May 1, 2018Starr, Aaron, City of Oxnard Mayor https://www.starrforoxnard.com/ California Primary June 5th 2018Ferreira, Tim, CA Lt. Governor https://crm.tim2018.com/ Gibbins, Ben, 52nd Assembly, http://www.bengibbins.com/ Hall, Jonathan Director, Tehachapi Cummings Water DIstrict, http://votersedge.org/ca/en/ballot/election/area/42/contests/contest/14372/candidate/134264?election_authority_id=15 Hancock, Joshua, CA 49th Assembly www.votejoshuahancock49th.usHerd, Mark Matthew, CA 2th Senate https://sites.google.com/site/herdforcd5/ Hewitt, Jeff, Riverside County Supervisor http://www.votehewitt.com/ Lewis, Michael, 53rd CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/lewisforassembly/ Lightfoot, Gail, CA Secretary of State Mahoney, Michael, Orange County Supervisor ElectMahony.com/McArdle, Angela 34th Congressional (U.S.) http://angelamcardleforcongress.com/ Reid, Derrick Michael, US Senate www.derrickmreid.com/Reiser, Brandon, 48th Congressional (U.S.) https://www.brandonreiser.com/ Robson, Honor, 70th CA Assembly https://www.honorrobson.com/ Shaw, Kevin, 38th CA Assembly https://www.facebook.com/KevinShaw4Liberty/ Tomolak, Josh, San Diego City Council www.tomolak4sd.com/Wildstar, Nikolas, CA Governor http://governorwildstar.com/ This may be the most Libertarian candidates running in a primary in or from Southern California since Top Two. If I have missed anyone or anything let me know and I’ll update the list. For updates or information about candidates in or from Northern California, check out https://ca.lp.org/2018-whos-running/ . To see a video of me delivering this Report, it’s near the beginning at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoGK8mADDAs . Issues: The aftermath of Dovner v. LPLAC is still causing real trouble in LA County. We’ve had officers cooperating to create a zero-sum game where none existed before, to quash activism in the County. Members have expressed serious grievances that have gone unresolved, and alleged actionable torts. Officers have escalated the conflict instead of defusing it. LPLAC will resolve the issue internally. It is fortunate that the victims are dedicated libertarians who are committed to resolution using libertarian principles. They are not likely to sue the Party, but do not expect them to bury the wrongs done to them. I hope that they will continue to expose the wrongs until those responsible take action to make amends. It's so much better than walking away hurt or embittered.
Officers of the Party should be peacemakers, not factional warriors. Our party will only grow by accepting diversity. We can’t build lasting consensus by quashing dissent. When members can’t work out disputes among themselves, the option most consistent with non-aggression is to agree on a process for resolving their differences. Where all are free and equal, only a neutral process acceptable to both parties can resolve questions of fault and set remedies for wrongs. If not the bad feelings continue and past mistakes can’t be fixed. So if you’re a party member and are aware of a grievance against you, reach out and discuss the issue privately with the member who has the grievance. If the other member is offering to meet you, accept the offer! So much the more if you are an officer. Otherwise you are declaring war. The other side can only conclude you have no interest in peace.
Affiliate Support: The LPC has budgeted support for the Southern California LP Office, to be supervised by the S. VIce Chair. Please contact me (jonathan@jaech.net) if you need materials, equipment or other support for LP activism in the region. The budget is large enough to make a difference for grass-roots activism.

2018 California Libertarian candidates: U.S. Senate

The California Libertarian Activist invites Libertarian candidates in California to provide statements about their candidacy for our members and subscribers. In 2018, the LP of California has one candidate for U.S. Senate, who provides the following statement.*


Derrick Michael Reid

Derrick Michael Reid, 2018 Libertarian candidate for U.S. Senate in California

I am a Californian for all Californians, a moderate and a problem solver, seeking to unite multipartisan factions for solving major problems, primarily including immigration, imprisonment, and corruption. Second-class people live in the shadows. Prisons are overpopulated. Political and monetary corruption permeates government functions. With 50 million hungry, 100 million unemployed, and 20 trillion in debt, the two major pandering political machines have failed the nation and have concentrated totalitarian power in D.C.

As an Engineer, Lawyer, and Military, Market, and Geopolitical Analyst, system analysis offers a comprehensive solution set to many problems facing California and the country. Many problems flow from insufficient negative feedback controls. I seek to bring together in compromise opposing factions to find common ground solutions and promote domestic tranquility. Other problems particular to California include indebtedness, poverty, homelessness, taxation, infrastructure, and pollution, which can be addressed in the federal context for solving like problems nationwide. The problems are enumerable and the rancor is undignified.

Economic stagnation is viewed by corporate revenues and labor participation. The prospects of higher interest rates could implode the bond market, and with it, the equity markets and the economy. Integrated solutions are ready when collapse occurs. Congress should have at least one senator who knows how to recover quickly, with a debt jubilee, a monetary reset, and government reforms to restore real money, honest markets, the Constitution, and the Republic for long term prosperity with maximum liberty.

Campaign web site: www.DerrickMReid.com


* Candidate statements have not been edited.

The post 2018 California Libertarian candidates: U.S. Senate appeared first on Libertarian Party of California.

LP San Francisco activists invite petitioners to stop Top Two, slash gas taxes

by Aubrey Freedman

In December, members and activists of the the LP of San Francisco started to gather signatures for two initiatives circulating statewide to qualify for the November 2018 election.  The initiatives each need at least 585,407 valid signatures to appear before the voters, and their deadlines are coming up this spring.

The proposed Measure 1816, spearheaded by Tom Palzer and endorsed by the LP of California,  would repeal the top-two election system that has been in place in California since 2011, and would return us to the semi-closed primary system.

Under the old system, each qualified state political party had a chance to put forth their own, partisan candidate in the general election.  Under the current top-two system, only the two highest vote-getters, regardless of party affiliation, are advanced to the November election.

Not one single alternative-party candidate has ever advanced on to the general election in the six years that we’ve had Top Two, except for rare occasions when only one major party member was running.  When Barbara Boxer finally retired from the senate last year, in the general election, the voters were treated to the so-called choice of only two Democratic candidates — Kamala Harris and Loretta Sanchez — with similar views.  Is it any surprise that a full 16 percent of the voters left that office blank on their ballots? Clearly, that wasn’t much of a choice.

Even though Democrats soundly control California state politics, even they are supporting the repeal of Top Two and a return to the previous system, because they have been forced to spend nearly $200 million in contests featuring two Democrats.  A return to the old system will give more choices to all voters in the November election, and it will encourage more candidates of all political persuasions to run for state offices again.

Libertarians support more choice in voting, as in all areas.

The filing deadline for Measure 1816 is April 23.

Proposed Measure 1830 would amend the California constitution to require that the gas tax increases that went into effect on Nov. 1 be approved by the voters, or repealed.  No need to say much about this one.  With the second highest gas tax burden in the nation before the recent increases of 12 cents per gallon of regular gas and 20 cents per gallon of diesel (as well as other new fees), our state legislators have squandered millions of dollars and insisted new taxes were needed just to pave the roads.  (Never mind infrastructure improvements such as fixing interchanges—they say that RM3, the $3 increase in tolls for all San Francisco Bay bridges [except the Golden Gate Bridge], scheduled for the November 2018 ballot, will go toward those infrastructure needs.)   Mismanagement of the taxes collected specifically for the roads should not constitute a compelling reason to reward the politicians with more money to waste.  How do other states manage to maintain their roads with lower taxes?

The filing deadline for Measure 1830 is May 21.

Interestingly enough, the other good initiative (Proposed Measure 1800) which failed to qualify, would have repealed the recent gas tax increases, but it did not contain the added feature of Measure 1830, which insists the voters approve the current tax increases and any future increases before going into effect.  Thus, this measure would have repealed the recent tax increases, but the politicians could have gone right back to the drawing board and enacted new taxes again without voter approval (and knowing them, they surely would have).  On the other hand, the voters could have approved the new and higher taxes if 1830 had made it onto the ballot, but we’re counting on the California voters outside the Bay Area to use their noodle and overwhelmingly vote YES on 1830, and NO on all gas tax increases.

If you would like to help gather signatures for either of these initiatives, please e-mail us at Chair@LPSF.org.  These initiatives will need paid circulators to secure the huge number of signatures needed, but your volunteering to collect even a handful of signatures from your family and friends would be a big help.

More choices on the ballot and lower taxes would benefit everyone, statewide.


Aubrey Freedman is chair of the Libertarian Party of San Francisco.

To find your own county’s petition-drive coordinator for Measure 1816, visit the web site of the Foundation to Stop Top 2: StopTop2.com/e-mail-county-coordinator

The post LP San Francisco activists invite petitioners to stop Top Two, slash gas taxes appeared first on Libertarian Party of California.

Raise your campaign’s first $10,000 in 7 days

Tremendous resources are available to activists, candidates, and campaign volunteers of the LP of California, as an affiliate of the national Libertarian Party. Many of the tools are easily accessible at the web site LPAction.org, managed by Andy Burns, the LNC’s state affiliate development specialist.

Here we feature LP communicator Michael Cloud’s advice for quickly raising funds — arguably the fuel that powers the engine of the party, as the political wing of the individual-liberty movement.


Raising your first $10,000 in 7 days

by Michael Cloud

“In politics, it’s no go without dough.” —Evry’s Law

Some Libertarians succeed by re-inventing the wheel. Most Libertarians fail by re-inventing the flat tire. Here’s the simplest, easiest, fastest way to raise the first $10,000500 for your next campaign in only seven days.

Why is the first $10,000 so important? That $10,000 is your campaign’s seed corn. Political start-up capital. Yeast to make the bread rise. The first seven days of a fitness program, the first seven days of a diet, or the first seven days of developing a new skill, set the pace for all that follows. A strong beginning fans the flames of faith. A weak start breathes life into self-doubt. “You don’t have to recover from a good start,” said John Wareham.

Can it really be done in only seven days? Some candidates raised the first $10,000 in seven hours. Others in a day. Many in three days. A few took the whole week. Nobody needed more than seven days.

Steps to success

You’ll be doing one-on-one personal fund-raising for your campaign. The steps are elegant and simple and easy:

  • Who do you ask for money?
  • How much do you ask for?
  • Where do you ask for the money?
  • When do you ask for the money?
  • How do you ask for it? Exactly what do you say?

Who do you ask for money?

Before you read this section, get some blank paper and a pen.  Ready?

First, we’ll make a preliminary list of the people you know who know you. If you’re well-known in your community, many people you don’t know may recognize you. Leave them off your list. If you stay up on what’s going on in your community, you will recognize many people who don’t know you. Leave them off your list. To qualify for your preliminary list, the person must know you and you must know the person.

Don’t consider whether they can or can’t afford to give, whether they will or won’t give, whether they should or shouldn’t give. This is just a preliminary list.

  1. Write down the names of your immediate blood relatives. One name per line, list your father and mother, your brothers and sisters. What about grandmothers and grandfathers? Aunts and uncles you stay in touch with?
  2. If you’re married, write the name of your spouse, mother-in-law, father-in-law … and any of your spouse’s immediate blood relatives.
  3. Write down the names of your personal friends.
  4. List the people you socialize with. Who do you go to dinner with? Have over for parties? Go camping with? Play bridge with? What other social activities do you engage in? Who with?
  5. What organizations (other than the LP) are you involved in? Rotary Club? Lions? Chamber of Commerce? church? charity? a support group? Mensa? the Society for Creative Anachronism? square dancing? ballroom dancing? university boosters? health club? What else? Who do you usually sit next to, talk with, and spend time with at the gatherings or meetings? Write their names down.
  6. Write the names of the coworkers that you spend time at work with. (Don’t list or ask people who report to you at work. It borders on harassment.)
  7. If you’re a member of one of the professions, own a business, are self-employed, or in sales, who are your regular, repeat, favorite clients? They could be doing business with someone else in your field, but they are loyal to you. They know you, trust you, like you and believe you. List their names.
  8. Who do you spend money with? Who do you do business with? Who is your doctor? your dentist? chiropractor? car mechanic? Who owns the used book or music store you frequent? Who owns the small boutique or men’s store you patronize? Who is your insurance agent? Who’s your pet’s veterinarian? Who styles your hair? Who owns the dry cleaner where you spend $500 a year? Who’s your real estate agent? car salesperson? printer? coffee house proprietor? health food store owner?
    Who else do you spend money with? If they know you and you know them, if you’ve done repeat business with them, especially if you’ve sent them business … list their names. (Your checkbook, credit card billing, cell-phone contact list, appointment calendar, holiday card list, and receipts are gold mines for this chunk.)
  9. Who else do you personally know who personally knows you? List their names.

Congratulations! You’ve put together your basic, preliminary list. Other names may occur later. Write them down as they occur. As the Arabs say, “The palest ink is more reliable than the strongest memory.”

Second, list the phone numbers and addresses next to the names on your list.

Third, put a check mark next to the name of everyone on your list whom you’ve personally talked with for at least 30 minutes during the last 12 months. This is your list of prospective donors.

Raise your campaign’s first $10,000 in 7 days

Michael Cloud

How much money do you ask for?

These people are not motivated to give because of the Libertarian Party, the Libertarian philosophy, your unanswerable arguments for your positions, the benefits of living in a better society, or even because they despise the incumbent.

They are giving to you because of you and your personal relationship with them. Your family, from love, duty, and family ties. Your friends and co-workers, out of friendship, obligation, and personal ties. So, too, with the people you socialize with. Your clients and customers, out of goodwill and loyalty. And the people you spend money with and do business with will do it from goodwill and out of a sense of reciprocation. You scratched my back, now I’ll scratch yours. They want to return the favor. The only reason these people are motivated to give is because of you and their relationship with you. They know you and like you and trust you and believe you. The strength of your relationship and their income determines how much you can ask for.

  • Family and friends: Ask each one to give 1 percent of your estimate of the person’s annual income.
  • People you socialize with, co-workers, and clients: If you estimate they make under $35,000 a year, ask for $75. Over $35,000, ask for $150.
  • People you spend money with or do business with: If they provide a service, 10 percent of what you spent with them; If they sell goods, 10 percent of their estimated gross profit. List the appropriate amount next to each name on your list. You can always accept less than you ask for, but you’ll rarely be offered more.

Where do you ask?

The easiest thing to ignore is a letter — closely followed by fax and e-mail. So you won’t use these.

The next easiest thing to ignore is a phone call. There are answering machines, call-interrupt services, people in the home or office interrupting or waiting for the person you’re trying to talk with. Contacting anyone on your list by phone will be a last resort.

The hardest thing to lie to, ignore, put off, let down, refuse, or get rid of is a living, breathing person looking you in the eye. One on one, in person, is how you’ll be asking for almost all of your contributions.

Also remember that you can’t immediately collect a check through the mail or over the phone. You can, in person.

If you live within 60 miles of the person on your list, go to his office or home. (Telephone the others.)

When do you ask?

Pick a time when you can spend an uninterrupted seven minutes with the person. Don’t make a formal appointment. Don’t make a big deal about it. If you’re around other people, take the person aside with, “C’mere, I have some good news. You’re one of the first people I’ve told.”

How do you ask for the money?

With family, friends, co-workers and people you socialize with, here’s the basic format:

  1. For family: “Mom, I’ve got great news. I’m running for city council. Imagine…your son…the boy you raised…running for public office. Isn’t that terrific? I wanted you to be among the first to know.” “Mom, will you put $1,000 into your son’s campaign?” For friends: “David, I’ve got great news. I’m running for state legislature. Imagine…your golfing buddy, your regular golfing partner for 3 years…running for public office. Isn’t that terrific? I wanted you to be among the first to know.” “David, will you put $200 into your golfing sidekick’s campaign?”
  2. Always end by asking for the contribution.
  3. After you ask for the money, shut up. Even if the other person says nothing for what seems like an eternity, let the silence hang heavy until the other person fills it with words. Rule of thumb: Whoever talks next will be leaving money with the other person.
  4. If the person says “Yes,” ask him to get the checkbook so that the check “can be filled out as the law requires.” Tell him, “Please make the check payable to [appropriate campaign committee name].” Get the check, thank the person, and leave.
  5. Usually the person will be concerned about the amount you asked for, the campaign, or why you’re running for office. Get him talking.
  6. If they have objections to helping or helping now, say, “Ohh? Tell me about it.” Keep them talking with a noncritical “Ohh?” Or “Uhh-huh….” And “really…?” And, “tell me more.” Let them talk. Let them express their feelings and thoughts.
  7. Then say, “I see…but I am your [relationship] and I’d really like your help. If $750 is too much, how much would you be willing to put into the [your name] for [office] campaign?”
  8. If they name a reasonable amount — 50 percent or more of what you asked for — get the check filled out, get the check, thank them, and leave.
  9. If they still have objections or concerns, repeat steps 6, 7, and 8.
  10. In many cases you will need to ask for the money three times. If they do not give, or they claim they cannot give, thank them for being your [relationship], thank them for letting you share your great news, and say goodbye.
  11. That evening, send them a thank-you card letting them know you appreciate their being your [relationship], thank them for considering donating, and ask them if they wouldn’t reconsider donating. Ask them to mail you a donation, and be sure to enclose a stamped reply envelope and donation card.

Before you approach people you spend money with or do business with, review your last 12 months. Use the same format as above, through step 6. Change step 7 to incorporate reciprocation: “I see…But John, in the last 12 months, I spent $2,147 with you, and in the next 12 months I’ll probably spend another $2,147 with you. I’d like to know you appreciate me and my business…and the best way for me to know that is with your $175 donation to my campaign. Will you do it?” Other reciprocation sentences:

  • “I support your business…I’d like you to support my run for office.”
  • “I put money into your business…I’d like you to put money into my effort here.”
  • “I help your business….” Out of all the people you could do business with, you’ve remained loyal to this businessperson. How many thousands of dollars are your repeat business, customer loyalty, and ongoing support bringing his business over the lifetime of your patronage? Isn’t that worth something?

How do you schedule it?

You know your hours and commitments better than I do. Set aside two hours each weekday and four hours each weekend day, for seven days. Work it around your schedule.

Money is the fuel

Money is the fuel that runs your Libertarian campaign. It won’t make you a good driver or guarantee you reach your destination. But without it, you’re stalled and stuck.


Michael Cloud is the author of Unlocking More Secrets of Libertarian Persuasion; a three-time LP presidential campaign organizer; and a professional speechwriter and political strategist. He created and delivered nationwide his acclaimed “The Art of Libertarian Persuasion” seminars, and in 2000 was honored with the LP’s Thomas Paine Communication Award.

 

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